John & Eleanor King

Pension Application

King, John & Eleanor
W7986
B. L. Wt. 26694 160-55

[Note: This file is quite long, 64 pages. I have therefore not transcribed certain items that provided no useful information. Each of these omissions is specifically identified below. This transcription is in the order in which the documents appear in the file, not in chronological order.]

Family Record [page removed from Bible]

John King was married to his wife Eleaner May 17th Anno 1792 By whom he has issue –

Jenny McDowell King born Feb’y 13th Anno 1793

John King Born Feb’y 5th Anno 1795

Peggy King Born Sep’r 30th Anno 1799

David Kerr King Born Dec’r 20th Anno 1801

Abigail King Born 7 March Anno 1804

[Based on the handwriting, it looks like all of the entries up to this point were written by the same person at the same time.]

James King Born March 19th Anno 1806

Dovey King Born May 24th 1808

Eleoner Elizah King Born Nov. 18th Anno 1811

State of Georgia
Jackson County
on the 22nd Day Sept 1843

Personally appeared before the subscriber [remainder of statement cut off or missing]

 



State of Georgia
County of Jackson

On this seventeenth day of March A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty five personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace
within and for the county and state aforesaid Eleanor King aged 85 years, a resident of Jackson County in the state of Georgia, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that she is the widow of John King deceased who was a private in the revolutionary war and drew a pension at the rate of thirty dollars per annum under the Act of 7th June 1832, that she is now drawing a pension at the rate of thirty dollars per annum in conformity with the act of February 2nd 1848 and is the identical person mentioned in an original certificate now in her possession No. 2759 dated at the War office of the United States on the 4th day of January one thousand eight hundred and forty nine, signed by W. L. Marcy secretary of War and examined and countersigned by J. L. Edwards Commissioner of Pensions, and she refers to the declaration of her husband the said John King under the act of 1832 and her declaration and proofs, filed in the Pensions Office, under the act of 2nd February 1848 for evidence of her husband’s service, her marriage and her husband’s death etc. She makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the Bounty Land to which she may be entitled under act accproved March 3rd 1855. She also declares that she has never received nor applied for Bounty Land under this or any other act of Congress and that she is still the widow of the said John King at the time of executing this declaration.

Eleanor King
(signed by mark)

Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written, and I certify that I believe the claimant to be the identical person she
represents herself to be, and that I have no interest in said claim.

Wynn A. Worsham J. P.

State of Georgia
County of Jackson

On this seventeenth day of March A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty five personally appeared before me a Justice of the Peace with and for the county and state aforesaid Charles Witt and Robert Espey, who are credible and respectable witnesses, and being duly sworn according to law, declare that they are personally and well acquainted with Mrs. Eleanor King and swa her sign her name, by her makr, to the foregoin declaration, that they know her to be the identical person therein represented, and that she is now a widow; and they further swear that they are disinterested witnesses.

Charles Witt
Robert Espy

Sworn to and subscribed before the day and date above written; and I certify that Charles Witt and Robert Espey are citizens of Jackson
County in the state of Georgia and are credible sitnesses.

Wynn A. Worsham, J. P.

State of Georgia
County of Jackson

I P. F. Hinton clerk of the Inferior Court for the County and State aforesaid, do certify that Wynn A. Worsham Esqr. before whom the
foregoing declaration and affidavit were made and who witnessed the same is, and was at the time of so doing a Justice of the peace in and for said County, legally commissioned and sworn, and duly authorized to administer oaths and that his official signatures are [–?–].

Given under my hand and the seal of said Inferior Court this seventeenth day of March one thousand eight hundred and fifty five.

P. F. Hinton, Clerk

 



Georgia 12,624
John King
of Jackson in the State of Georgia who was a private in the company commanded by Captain Moffet of the reg’t commanded by Col. Mathews in the Va. line for nine months.

Inscribed on the Roll of Georgia at the rate of 30 Dollars per annum, to commence the 4th day of March 1831

Certificate of Pension issued the 15th day of May and sent to Hon. A. S. Clayton, Athens, Ga.

 

Arrears to the 4th of March 33 60.00
Semi-anl. allowance ending 4th Sept. 15.00
75.00

 

Revolutionary Claim
Act June 7, 1832

Recorded by Rush Newnan, Clerk
Book E. Vol. 6 Page 95

 



Declaration
In order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the 3rd March 1843 granting pensions for one yiar[?] to certain widows who have
received pensions under the act of July 7 1838

State of Georgia
Jackson County

In this twenty second day of September 1843 personally appeared before me Robert Espy a Justice of the Inferior court for said county and state Eleanor King a resident of said county and state aged seventy three years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed the 3rd of March 1843 granting pensions to widows of persons who served during the Revolutionary War. That she is the widow of John King who was a soldier in the war of the revolution and was a pensioner of the United States under the act of June 1832 at the rate of $30.00 per annum in Jackson County Georgia. That she was married to the said John King on the 17th day of May 1792 that he died on the 22nd day of June 1840 leaving her as his widow and that she is still his widow.

Eleoner King
(signed by mark)

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me & I further certify that Mrs. Eleoner King is personally known to me. In testimony whereof I have hereto subscribed my name this 22 Sept 1843.

Robert Espy J.I.C.

[attestation of Robert Espy’s signature by John J. McCulloch and of McCulloch’s signature by Howell Cobb omitted]

 



State of Georgia
Jackson County
1832

On this 6th day of Nov’r personally appeared in open court before us the Inferior Court of Jackson County now sitting John King a resident of the state of Georgia in the County of Jackson. Agreeable to his father’s record he was born in the year of our Lord 1755 which now makes him 76 years of age, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed the 7th of June 1832.

1st that he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers as herein stated. He John King then living in Virginia state and County of Augusta a frontier County Early in Revolutionary War the Indians was commiting hostility on the frontiers of Augusta Cty Charles lewis being Colonel of the County ordered two companys of the militia to gard and be stationed on the frontiers of the aforesaid county. He the aforesaid John was drafted and first(?) under George Moffet Capt. Campble and Seawright Subbolles(?) and were marched into Greenbrier the frontier past Augusta County and there they built a fort and stationed therein for three months which was the stated term by the laws for the militia to serve which he the said John served but he got no written discharge nor to his knowledge did any get one that served with him.

2nd The next term he served was occasioned by an Express from Greenbrier of a station being attacked by the Indians which he and a number of other soldiers turned to their releif. When we arrived at the station the Indians was gone. Some of the company returned. He the aforesaid John and others stayed at the request of Capt. Sam’l Lewis who had the command of the station in order to assist in garding against the Indians and to fulfill the term. This time of service he could not recollect, but it was in the summer 1777 or 1778 who was[page ends here]

3rd tour of militia duty he was drafted to watch or gard a party of the British which lay in Portsmouth from making in roads in the country, under the command of Col. Samson Mathews. Major Allexander Robertson and Joseph Patterson Capt. all officers of the militia he never was initiated [–?–] any genneral engagements his place of residence was in Virginia and County of Augusta and was throughout the Revolutionary War. In our march we passed Charlottsvill, Ritchmon, Petersburg, and so on to Portsmoth or not far distant from it. He entered the service about the firs or near it of the 7ear 1781. He got no writen discharge but he knows he served the full tour which was three months by him the said John King and was in the service at Portsmoth when the Battle at Gilford was fought.

4th tour When Lord Cornwallis making in Virginia supposing he was [–?–]ing for the barracks where the [–?–] prisoners were stationed. He John King of Augusta County vallentured(?) and many others all on horses. Col. Wm. Bowyer and Alexr. Robertson Majr. Commanders of the militia troops of Agusta County, passing over rockfish gap and so to Charlotsvill. Cornwallis had turned his [–?–] towards Ritchmond. The American army then headed by Genneral Waine pursued on through Ritchmond on towards old James town. The advance part of Gen’l. Wain’s army had a little brush with the rear of the British before they got in their shiping. Col. Bowyer was taken prisoner and paroled. The British went down the river and and made a stand in Little York, the horses were sent home, and the men continued service to answer their tour. And he John King among others stayed. He do not know one man that served with him in the revolutionary war living in this state.

Sworn to and subscribed before me in open court this 6th Nov. 18—
Joseph Hampton J. I. C.

 


[text of letter dated 13 Jan 1934 to Mrs. William Van Bell omitted] [text of letter dated 21 Jun 1918 from Miss Maud Mobley omitted]

 



Jefferson Ga
Oct. 3rd 1848
Sir –
Inclosed I send you the declaration of Mrs. King the widow of John King who was a revolutionary pensioner. You will please when you shall have examined her claim address me at this place. I am with the utmost respect your most obedt. servt.
John J. McCulloch

 


 

8017
Georgia
Eleanor King widow of John King who was a pensioner under the Act of 7th June ’32 and who died on the 22nd day of June ’40 of Jackson in the State of Georgia who was a private in the Company commanded by Captain Moffet of the Regiment commanded by Col. Matthews in the line for nine months Inscribed on the Roll of Georgia at the rate of 30 Dollars per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March, 1836
Certificate of Pension issued the thirteenth day of January 1844 and sent to Thomas Green Wasington City
Total Amount $150.00[Act July 7, 1838] Recorded by F. H. Duvadige(?) Clerk
Book D Vol. 1 Page 327(?)

 



Richmond 11 Oct 1843
Col. J. L. Edwards
Commr. of Pensions
Sir
Enclosed, I send you the application of Mrs. Eleaner King of John King (late pensioner) for her pension under the act 7 July 1838. You will find the original certificate of marriage in 1792 & the record from the Family Bible. John King rec’d $30 per annum under the act of 1832
in Jackson County Georgia.
I am yr. obt svt
Thomas Green

 



Georgia 6786
Eleanor King
widow of John King
who was a Private
in the Revolution
Inscribed on the Roll at the rate of 30 Dollars per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March, 1843.
Certificate of Pension issued the 16th day of April and sent to Thomas Green, Esqr. Richmond, Va.[Act of March 3, 1843] Recorded in Book A Vol. 2 Page 174

 



State of Georgia
Jackson County

On this fifth day of September 1848 personally appeared before the subscriber a Justice of the Inferior Court for said County Eleanor King a resident of Jackson County Georgia aged seventy seven years who being first duly sworn, according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the provision made by the act of Congress passed on the 2nd(?( February 1848 granting pensions to widows of persons who served during the Revolutionary War. That she is the widow of John King who was a private in the War of the Revolution & a United States pensioner at the time of his death at the rate of Thirty dollars per annum and died in the County of Jackson state of Georgia. That she drew a pension of thirty dollars per annum under the act of Congress passed 17th June 1844.

She further declares that she is still a widow.

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me

Eleanor King
(signed by mark)

Robert Espy J.I.C.

I do certify that Eleanor King the above declarant is personally known to me and that she is the identical Eleanor King she represents
herself to be and drew a pension as stated by her.

Robert Espy J. I. C.

[certification of Robert Espy’s signature by P. F. Hinton and P. F. Hinton’s signature by Howell Cobb omitted]

 


[form letter re payment of pension omitted] [another cover letter from Thomas Green to Col. Edwards omitted] [letter from Thomas Green to Col. Edwards re additional pension amount omitted]

 



Jefferson Ga.
May 23rd 1856
No. 16127

Sir –

The claim of Mrs. Eleanor King, widow of John, a Revolutionary soldier & Pensioner, for Bounty land under the Act of 3rd of March 1855, having been suspended for want of Record proof of the services of John as required by the 3rd Sect. of the said act is again presented under the recent amendatory act of Congress, and a reconsideration of her claim respectfully requested.

Your most obt. servt.
John J. McCulloch

[To] Commissioner of Pensions
Washington D.C.

 

 

 

 

 



State of North Carolina
Rowan County

I do hereby certify that by virtue of a license to me directed, I have joined together in the banns of holy Matrimony Mr. John King and
Miss Elinor Kerr daughter to Mr. David Kerr of Coddle Creek Settlement.

Given under my hand this 17th of May 1792
Wall Braly J. P.

This may certify that the above named Elenor Kerr having lived in this congregation from her infancy has always behaved herself prudently and has been admitted as a member in full communion in the Church and at her departure is free of any Scandal.

Certified at Coddle Creek
May 25th 1792

by John Braly Senr.

 


[The next document is creased and at least two lines are therefore unreadable.] John Espy a resident of the County and State aforesaid and Joel C. Neal of the same place respectable persons who after being duly sworn deposeth and saith that the above leave was cut out of the Family Bible that formerly belonged to John King and that the entry made therein is in his handwriting. And they further say that John King died in the 22nd day of June 1840 in the County and state aforesaid. This leaf above referred to hereto annexed by three wafers.

John Espy
Joel C. Neal

Sworn to and subscribed on the 22nd day of September 1843 before me a Justice of the Inferior Court for the county and state aforesaid and I further certify that John Espy and Joel C. Neal are respectable persons and creditable witnesses this 22nd Sept 1843.

Robert Espy J. I. C.

[certification of Robert Espy’s signature by John J. McCulloch and John J. McCulloch’s signature by Howell Cobb omitted][cover letter from Thomas Green to Col. J. L. Edwards omitted]

To explain and amend his declaration for a pension

Georgia State
Jackson County

Personally appeared before me undersigned a Justice of the Inferior Court of the County aforesaid, John King who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that by old age and the consequent loss of memory he cannot swear positively as to the length of time he served but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than nine months as a privet[sic] in the militia, the whole of the four tours stated in his declaration, and for such service he claim a pension. Also he further deposeth and saith that he relinquish every claim to any other pension than the one under the act of June 7th 1832.

Furthermore deponent saith that his sister had no knowledge or recollection of the service actualy done. She only recollected he was out on the different tours specified in her affidavit that there was no contradiction in his and her declaration, as he was the only one that had a knowledge of the service done as he knew(?) of in this state. Also his sister Jane McCutchen was of mature age in the time of Revolutionary War, and always appeared to stand fair and unspoted(?) among her acquaintance.

John King

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 23rd day of April 1833

Edward Adams J. I. C.

[certification of John King’s signature by Edward Adams and Edward Adams by Sylvanus Ripley omitted]

 



State of Georgia
Jackson County

Be it known that on the 18th day of November 1843 personally appeared before me Robert Espy a Justice of the Inferior Court for the County and state aforesaid John Espy aged eighty four years of said county and state being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following statement that he has been acquainted with John King (who was a pensioner of the United States under the act of 7 June 1832 in Jackson County Georgia) and Eleanor King (his widow) for the span of fifty years or more past and that they have been living together peaceably as man and wife from his first acquaintance with them and were always reputed and believed in this neighborhood where they have resided to have been legally married and he concurs in that opinion and this deponent further saith that the aforesaid John King died on the 22nd day of June 1840 in the county and state aforesaid leaving Mrs. Elinor King as his widow.

John Espy

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me & I further certify that the said John Espy is a respectable person and credible witness. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 18th day of November 1843

Robert Espy J.I.C.

[certification of Robert Espy’s signature by John J. McCuloch omitted]

 



Declaration

In order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the 7 July 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows

State of Georgia
Jackson County

On this 21st day of September 1843 personally appeared before me the subscriber a Justice of the Inferior Court for the county and state aforesaid Elioner King a resident of Jackson County and state of Georgia aged seventy three years who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on her Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the act of Congress passed the 7 July 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows: That she is the widow of John King of the county and state aforesaid the identical person named in an original certificate of which the following is a true copy.

War Department
Revolutionary Claim

I certify that in conformity with the Law of the United States of the 7th June 1832 John King of the state of Georgia who was a private in the War of the Revolution is entitled to receive thirty dollars per anum during his natural life commencing on the 4th of March 1832 and payable semi-annually on the 4th of March and 4th of September in every year. Given at the War office of the United States this 15th day of May one thousand eight hundred and thirty three.

Lew Cass
Secretary of War

J. L. Edwards
Commissioner of Pensions

That said John King was a private and served in the War of the Revolution and for proof of his services she refers to the evidence on which on which [sic] he drew his pension. And this deponent further states that the said John King died on the 22nd day of June eighteen hundred and forty in the county of Jackson and state of Georgia. And this deponent further declares that she was married to the said John King on the 17th day of May seventeen hundred and ninety two in the county of Roan[sic] North carolina and that her husband died on the day aforesaid. That she has no documentary evidence further than the record in their Family Bible in her husband’s own handwriting and the certificate of marriage. Likewise that she knows of no person living who could testify to the fact. That she has
remained a widow ever since the period of her husband’s death that she was not married prior to her husband’s last service but was married prior to the 1st day of January 1794 Viz at the time above stated as will more fully appear by proof hereunto annexed

Eleoner King
(signed by mark)

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me and I further certify that Mrs. Eleoner King from bodily infirmity is unable to attend Court In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 1st day of September 1843

Robert Espy J.I.C.

 



State of Georgia
Jackson County

Be it known that on 21st day of September 1843 personally appeared before me Robert Espy a Justice of the Inferior Court in and for the County and state aforesaid John Espy aged eighty four years of said county and state being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following statement that he has been acquainted with John King and Eleanor King for the span of fifty years or more past and that they have been living together peaceably as man and wife from his first acquaintance with them and were always reputed and believed in this neighborhood where they have resided to have been legally married and he he [sic] concurs in that(?) opinion and this deponent further saith that John King died on the 22nd day of June 1840 in the county and state aforesaid.

John Espy

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me. I further certify that the said John Espy is a respectable person and creditable witness.

Term 1843
State of Georgia
Jackson County

Called Court the 28 day September 184[3] The Declaration of Mrs. Eleoner King wid[ow] of John King for a pension under the act of July 1838 d[uly] certified by Robert Espy a Justice of the Inferior Court of Jac[kson] County having been submitted to the Court it doth approve [–?–] acts and proceedings
John J. McCulloch clk

Middleton Witt J.I.C.
T. Harrison J.I.C.
N. C. Jarratt J.I.C.

 



Mr. John Harrison a Clergyman residing in Jackson County Georgia & J. T. Cunningham residing in the same place hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John King who has subscribed & sworn to the above declaration; that we believe him to be 78 years of age; & that he is reputed & believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier in the Revolution, & that we concur in that opinion.

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid

John Harrison
Joseph T. Cunningham

And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter & after putting the interrogatories by the War Department, that the above named applicant John King was a Revolutionary Soldier & served as he states. And it further appears to them that John Harrison who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman residing in the County of Jackson Georgia & that Joseph T. Cunningham who has also signed the same, is also a resident of the same place & is a credible person & that their statement is entitled to credit.
the 6th Nov 1832

Joseph Hampton J.I.C.
Meyr J. Brown J.I.C.
David Witt J.I.C.

[certification of proceedings by Sylvanus Ripley and of Sylvanus Ripley by M.C. Clayton omitted]

N.B. He refers to the following persons in his present neighborhood who will testify as to his character for veracity & their belief of his services as a soldier of the revolution – Wm. Matthews, Russel Jones, Allen Matthews, Sterling Mays, Joseph Crawford

 


[The following two letters deal with another John King, and were apparently misfiled. “J. Richardson” is most likely Joseph Richardson, a Congressman from Massachusetts from 1827-1830.]

War Dept Bounty Land Office
Apl 9th 1830

The Honl. J. Richardson

Sir

Yours of yesterdays date, informing me that the inquiry submitted in your letter of the 2nd Inst. was intended for John King, and not (as therein stated) for William King – I have therefore to acquaint you that, a like careful examination of the records of the Massachusetts line has been made, under the present enquiry, as was made under the former; the result of which is that the name of John King was not returned at the close of the War, on the records of the line aforesaid, among those entitled to Bounty Lands from the U. States.

Yours etc etc
Wm. Gordon

 



Washington Apl 8 1830
To Wm. Gordon esq.
B. L. Office

Sir,

It was John King instead of William King whose heirs claim that they are entitled to bounty land on account of the services of their father in the war of the revolution. I believe the error was mine in giving the wrong name for inquiry.

Pardon me for giving you the trouble of making another inquiry for the name of John King of Mass. supposed to have belonged to Baley’s or Jackson’s Regiment to ascertain if he was entitled to bounty land.

Yours very respectfully
J. Richardson
H. Reps

 



Georgia State
Hall County

Sept 15th 1832

This day personally came Jane McCutchen before me a Justice assigned to keep the peace in said County and deposeth and saith that she lived in Virginia Augusta County the time of the Revolutionary War at her Father, and that John King her Brother, place of residence was there also, and she the said deponent knew that her brother John was two tours on the fronteers of the aforesaid County against the Indians and also two tours against the British towards the end of the war . further more deponent saith not

Jane McCutchin
(signed by mark)

Sworn to and Subscribed this 15th day of Sept. 1832
James Russel J. P.

[certification by A. S. Clayton, James Law, and Charles Dougherty omitted]

 


[The next item in the file is an undated form identifying items in the original pension application requiring “further proof or explanation.” This form is interesting primarily as an example of how little bureaucracy has changed in the last 180 years (as a retired bureaucrat, I would certainly know), so I have not transcribed it, but you can view pages onetwo, and three of the form if you like.]

[letter dated Jan 5. 1934 from Mrs. William Van Bell of Hawkinsville, Ga. omitted] [letter dated June 28, 1913 to Miss Maud Mobley of Social Circle, Ga. omitted] [form summarizing information in the file omitted]

 



Jefferson Ga.
August 21st 1855

Sir
Yours of the 10th inst. notifying me that the claim of Mrs. Eleanor King, widow of John, No. 16127 act 3rd March/55, was still suspended, was unexpected, notwithstanding your former notice of June 25th. In your circular of April 1855, I am informed in regard to evidence already furnished. – “In the case of a person applying for additional land, under the new act,” (or an original claim for land I suppose) “a repetition of evidence is not required. When the necessary evidence is on file in this or any other executive office at the seat of Government, a reference in the application to such a state of facts will be sufficient.” There is on file in your offices, evidence that John King served seven months, upon which he drew a pension and on which Mrs. King now draws a pension, of thirty dollars per annum. In Mrs. King’s application for land she is identified and I think reference clearly made to these facts. Again to the first of your circular, “any entry made by a person in the day and time said service was rendered, whose duty it was to notice and register the fact” “The records of many towns” “historical societies” and “well accredited histories” “and such like proofs of service are not to be disregarded” and yet the evidences, upon which a soldier has drawn pension, made before your predecessor, and now on file in your office, is to be considered
of less dignity, than evidence procured from the (less reliable) sources, before enumerated. It is often said, “Convince a man against his will, He’s of the same opinion still.”

I have all the time, and still entertain the same opinion, in construing the 3rd section, that the applicant who served fourteen days or more may prove service either by record or parole testimony; but when the service was less than fourteen days he would be held down to record testimony. why mention fourteen days unless there was to be a observed a difference between him who served fourteen days or more and him who served less than fourteen? “except” “and unless” in the 3rd sec. have reference to claimants who served less than fourteen days, and to no others. Shall I hear from you again? or shall I be deemed impertinent?

Most respectfully
Your obt servt
John J. McCulloch

[To] Com. of Pensions
Washington
DC.

 

 

 

 

 



Claim No. 16127
July 31st 1855
Jefferson Ga.

Sir –
By your letter of June 25th I am informed the claim of Mrs. Eleanor King for bounty land under 3rd March 1855 has been examined and suspended in the ground that the revolutionary service of John King the husband of the applicant does not appear of record in your office. Certainly in this case the applicant cannot be held down to record evidence. Her husband proved service of some seven months in the revolutionary war and was allowed a pension of thirty dollars per annum during life under the act of 7th June 1832 his widow has regularly drawn pension at the same rate under act of July 1838 3rd March 1843, 17th June 1844 also 2nd February 1848. These facts appearing on file, on proof of personal identity, I supposed Mrs. King had made out her case. In your “Instructions and forms to be
observed by persons applying to the Pension Office for bounty land under act of 3rd March 1855” you enumerate seven classes of soldiers who are entitled to bounty land provided he shall have served a period of not less than fourteen days, and shall establish (you say) his service by record evidence. How such construction can be given the law I am at a loss to determine. The language of the law does not in my judgement justify it. But on your second page you enumerate five other classes which most clearly must be held down to “record evidence.” Mrs. King belongs to the 5th class first noticed, and her husband’s service having been previously proven, she cannot be held down to “record evidence.” Such applicants only as served less than fourteen days are by the laws held down to record proof. Mrs. King’s case I hope will be reexamined and favorable considered. I shall say no more until I learn that you still persist in your
requisition of Mrs. King.

Most Respectfully
Your obt servt
John J. McCulloch

[To] Comr. of Pensions
Washington D.C.

 

Submitted by Cheryl Chasin